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Question: What did you think of Fog On The Tyne?
5 stars - a dyed-in-the-wool classic - 2 (40%)
4 stars - enjoyed it a lot - 0 (0%)
3 stars - enjoyed it just fine - 1 (20%)
2 stars - not great, but a few redeeming features - 0 (0%)
1 star - didn't like this at all - 2 (40%)
0 stars - where's my Mum? - 0 (0%)
Total Voters: 5

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Author Topic: W/C 25th July - Lindisfarne - Fog On The Tyne  (Read 17390 times)
clairew
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« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2011, 07:01:12 PM »

I went to Lindisfarne once and all I got was this picture.




Thinking of going back anytime soon?
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Mouse
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« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2011, 08:40:50 PM »

Look like his boat ran aground.
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RobH
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« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2011, 09:00:16 PM »

I got to about half way through the second side and I just had to stop.  The vocals are some of the worst that I've heard - it makes me yearn for JA.  I'll give this one a miss.
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A James
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« Reply #18 on: July 26, 2011, 09:05:50 PM »

JA ?

I don't sing...
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AmazingWilf
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« Reply #19 on: July 26, 2011, 09:09:53 PM »

He means Jon Anderson, probably.
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David 'Wilf' Elliott
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A James
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« Reply #20 on: July 26, 2011, 09:10:17 PM »

I may have guessed that already  Roll Eyes
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AmazingWilf
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« Reply #21 on: July 26, 2011, 09:17:34 PM »

Well, what did you ask for, then? Tongue
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David 'Wilf' Elliott
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A James
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« Reply #22 on: July 26, 2011, 09:18:43 PM »

It's called 'spam'.  Someone has to do it.
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AmazingWilf
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« Reply #23 on: July 26, 2011, 09:21:03 PM »

I certainly chose the right bus...oh, hang on...
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David 'Wilf' Elliott
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RobH
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« Reply #24 on: July 27, 2011, 06:18:07 AM »

With the amount that James writes when there is nothing to write about, it'll be interesting to see what happens when there is something to say.
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A James
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« Reply #25 on: July 27, 2011, 06:21:10 AM »

The longest press release in the world ever.
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Ash
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« Reply #26 on: July 27, 2011, 07:40:04 PM »

nope not happening this week - internet too slow  Angry
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Trace
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« Reply #27 on: July 28, 2011, 09:36:22 PM »

I like this album, but as I've written elsewhere, the instruments really don't help. The vocals are definitely un-forced, not quite trad-folky, but there doesn't appear to be that much effort involved. But the backing is often just so over-the-top, as if they've got a fairground band playing. It's not going to stop me buying a copy, but it could have been so much better.
Willf - have the next 2 Lindisfarne albums got the same instrumental style?

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AmazingWilf
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« Reply #28 on: July 28, 2011, 10:09:54 PM »

Willf - have the next 2 Lindisfarne albums got the same instrumental style?
Pretty much. Nicely Out Of Tune was their first album, and is even more laid back, and Dingley Dell is marginally more experimental.

After that the lineup fragmented, Alan Hull and Ray Jackson taking on four new guys to make a couple of (I feel) underrated albums, Roll On Ruby and Happy Daze. Si Cowe, Ray Laidlaw and Rod Clements went off to form Jack The Lad - a mucb folkier proposition - with Billy Mitchell (who joined a much later lineup of Lindisfarne). The 'classic' lineup reformed in 1978 (having started the popular Christmas concerts in 1976, initially as temporary reunions) and made one good album (Back And Fourth) and one half ways decent one (The News) before descending into piffle for most of the mid to late eighties. After Alan Hull died they had a brief purple patch, I understand, but I'd really lost interest by then.
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David 'Wilf' Elliott
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Mouse
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« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2011, 03:20:08 AM »

I don't really know what I was expecting from this album. Some unpleasant memory of a possibly made up version of Fog On The Tyne had always clouded my vision where Lindisfarne were concerned (and I'm almost certain it was made up and not that dreaded re-recording that has been mentioned around here). I honestly had no reliable idea of what the band were like, so I welcomed this opportunity to finally test the water and see what was what. I have to say that some people's perspectives on the album had raised my expectations as to what was in store, so the first listen didn't leave much of an impression at all. It really is important to deny all other views on an album and listen to it for what it is, rather than how others may see it, an ability which I don't think I will ever fully master. Anyway. a few more spins and I think I can organise some words to express thoughts about it...

The one thing that really struck me about the sound of the album were the acoustic guitars that are present throughout. They have that bright, jangly, incredibly thin and tight sound that was quite typical of the 1970s. In fact, they sound so tight and thin that they could probably cut through wrought iron gates with ease. They remind me of my Mum's old acoustic, the setup of which was exactly like that - a real bugger to learn on. But anyway, I digress. The rhythm section is quite high in the mix throughout, which gives the beat a warm, boomy quality, almost disarming the thin acoustics. The vocals come across as being what they are - just honest, simple singing, no flashy power, just what the songs require, a means to work with the song and present the lyrics to the listener. There's very little change in terms of the instrumentation throughout. The bass is always there, in your face. The drums are always punchy. The acoustic guitars sound like they're being difficult to play. The piano playing sounds almost hyperactive when it jumps into a song and plonks away. The harmonica adds a bit more texture where it's present, as does the slide guitar.

The opening track, Meet Me On The Corner, I admit was exactly what I was expecting. And I admit that folk is not one of my favourite styles of music. But, it is performed well with its folky bounce and it does its job. Alright On The Night follows with a bit more of a straightforward song-based form, carrying on the lively spirit. Unlce Sam takes a bit more of a laid back approach at the beginning before going a bit bluesy as the rhythm section joins us again. Together Forever has, God forbid, a bit more of a country vibe, which is probably thanks to the harmonica and slide guitar, and it helps to vary things up a wee bit. January Song is rather nice and easy going, feeling quite relaxed. Peter Brophy Don't Care doesn't care, evidently going by the lyrics and stripped arrangement. City Song introduces a clean electric guitar, by jove! We are back on the folky incline again, though without the mild bounce of Meet Me On The Corner. Passing Ghosts appeals to me because of its chord sequence (I guess I must be a musician if I can come out with that). The sing-a-long chorus vocals have a nice, deep reverb on them, which helps the final sung "time" carry off into the distance. Train In G Major has a great lazy blues flow, with the harmonica further typifying the partnering of a train theme and the blues. The piano sounds too harsh with this feel, though, as if it were being played as hard as it could be played. The slightly dirty slide guitar is also a bit too much of a contrast to the clean acoustics, even though it really should work with the style. And so, we are delivered to the final track, which is also the title track, Fog On The Tyne. It feels like we are being delivered full circle, with the folk style returning (but was it ever really vacant?). And there's a fiddle solo! The whole idea of the album is really starting to become apparent now, for those (like me) who were expecting something a little more grand for an album of such reputation.

So, that whole idea, then. It sounds like a group of lads recording some tunes that they enjoy playing, possibly even rehearsing for an evening gig down the local pub. It is very loose, very relaxed and yet it is very tight. Even if the band were larking about, would the listener be able to tell? It would make a great set for an acoustic band to play in a proper pub. It sounds very together. But, it is what it is, and what it is is a nice collection of songs. There's no collective purpose for them, nor is there some grandoise statement being made. It is an album of songs that the band recorded and that's it, really. That's obviously not a bad thing, although it does make me wonder how it came to be held in such high regard. I hate the cover, though. I don't really care for that type of illustration anyway, but those colours are just horrible. The pink and yellow make it look like one of those old school history text books that smelt of age and had curious patches in the pages. I certainly don't think it's a good visual accompaniment to the record. As a light listening album, I enjoyed it. As a thorough listening experience, it just isn't to my tastes to reach those levels for me. Still, it was nice, so a solid three stars from me.
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'Horses never forget. That's why they're called "nature's elephants".'

http://mouseholemusic.blogspot.com/
http://soundcloud.com/themousehole
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